Creighton University School of Dentistry

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    $390,653*
    85
    2,187
    3.56
    19.4
    Private
    1905
    Omaha, NE
    *Note: Cost calculation does not include living expenses, student loan interest, or loan origination fees. 
    Creighton University Seal

    Background

    Creighton University School of Dentistry is located in Omaha, Nebraska. Established in 1905, it is one of the oldest dental schools in the United States. The broke ground on a new 200,000-square foot facility that is scheduled to open in July, 2018. Student enrollment is expected to increase from 340 students (85 per class) to 460 (115 per class) beginning in 2018. Currently, Creighton’s dental clinic sees 12,000 patients annually, and this number is expected to increase to 15,000 with the opening of the new facility. This will allow Creighton students to produce roughly $9 million in discounted dental services annually, a significant increase from the current $6.7 million.

    The Boyne School of Dentistry currently houses the school of dentistry and was built in 1973; it occupies about 140,000-square feet. The limited space and aging structure made it necessary to construct a new building. Creighton plans to expand its pediatric clinic significantly in the new structure.

    Tuition and Fees

    • Tuition:
      • 1st year: $66,120
      • 2nd year: $62,730
      • 3rd year: $62,730
      • 4th year: $62,730
    • Annual Increase: 4-7%
    • Living Allowance: 
      • 1st year: $16,200
      • 2nd year: $19,800
      • 3rd year: $19,800
      • 4th year: $19,800
    • Travel:
      • 2nd year: $1,200
      • 4th year: $1,450
    • Board Fees:
      • 2nd year: $387
      • 4th year: $3,135
    • Books/Supplies:
      • 1st year: $9,414
      • 2nd year: $9,484
      • 3rd year: $8,426
      • 4th year: $7,047
    • Total Tuition and Fees with 5% annual increase: $390,653

    Curriculum

    First Year

    CPD 111. Interpersonal Relationships and Communication. 2 credits. FA

    To assist in their orientation and adjustment to professional education, freshmen will participate in group introductions followed by discussions on interpersonal relationships. Communication styles, time management, problem solving, dealing with stress, and understanding various cultural differences will be addressed. 2S, 8W.

    CPD 113. Preventive Dentistry. 3 credits. FA

    Introduction to the philosophy and need for preventive dentistry by developing the student’s concepts of self-motivation; knowledge of dental diseases and abnormalities; application of the principles of fluoridation; nutrition, patient motivation, and home care. In addition, the student will develop skills for effective oral hygiene with reference to disclosing agents, toothbrushing, flossing, oral physiotherapy aids, and topical fluorides. 1R, 16W; 2R, 3L, 6W.

    CPD 115. History of Dentistry. 1 credit. FA

    Designed to acquaint the student with the history of dentistry from ancient times to the present. Emphasis is placed upon contributions by individuals and groups of individuals leading to the current status of dentistry in the United States. 1R, 8W.

    CPD 132. Community Dentistry Field Experience. 1 credit. SP

    Designed to acquaint students in small groups with area health problems and with area health services and agencies. Field experience is gained during dental health and/or career presentations in public and parochial schools. Visitations are made to provide a variety of experiences; to neighborhood schools; to water purification and flouridation facilities; and to a commercial dental laboratory. 2F, 4W; 3F, 4W (Split classes).

    CPD 136. Cardio-Pulmonary Resuscitation. 1 credit. SP

    A formalized course in Cardio-Pulmonary Resuscitation leading to CPR certification in Basic Life Support for Health Care Providers. 1R, 3L, 1W (Split classes).

    DAR 136. Introduction to Electronic Health Record Management. 1 credit.

    This preclinical course introduces the student to axiUm, the patient management system used in the Dental School clinic. Primary focus is on utilization of the electronic health record (EHR). The student will learn electronic patient form entry (EPR Form), odontogram charting, CDT procedure codes, and treatment note entry with an emphasis on preparing the student for the spring and summer periodontics courses and fall clinic rotation in oral diagnosis. Clinic.

    GDS 113. Dental Anatomy Lecture. 2 credits. FA

    The student is taught nomenclature, chronology, and methods of designation of human teeth. Form, size and contour of teeth, including external and internal anatomy of the permanent and primary dentitions, intertooth relationships, and occlusion are presented in detail. 1R, 16W.

    GDS 114. Dental Anatomy Laboratory. 7 credits. FA

    The student will draw and carve teeth to enlarged sizes using average anatomical measurements as well as duplicate teeth to natural size dimensions. 7L, 16W.

    GDS 115. Dental Materials Lecture. 2 credits. FA

    This course presents the fundamental principles of dental materials science as it applies to clinical dentistry including an understanding of the basis for laboratory and clinical use. The rationale for materials selection, as dictated by clinical procedure and product comparison, will also be presented. 1R, 16W.

    GDS 116. Dental Materials Laboratory. 3 credits. FA

    Specific dental laboratory projects will be accomplished to allow the student to become familiar with the handling characteristics of the dental materials presented in lecture. This will help to ensure competent use of commonly used dental materials at the clinical level. These exercises are also designed to improve manual dexterity and eye-hand coordination. 2L, 16W.

    GDS 135. Dental Materials and Introduction to Operative Dentistry Lecture. 4 credits. SP

    Composition and properties of the materials used in dentistry. Basic information on the design of preparatory work necessary for the mouth incident to the reception of these materials. A group research project designed to lead to a table clinic presentation will be conducted under the guidance of a faculty mentor. 2R, 16W.

    GDS 136. Dental Materials and Introduction to Operative Dentistry Laboratory. 4 credits. SP

    Application of materials used in dentistry with an emphasis on the treatment of single surface tooth lesions. 2L, 16W.

    ORB 113. Histology. 9 credits. FA

    Microscopic anatomy of normal mammalian and/or human tissues and organs. Light and electron microscopic aspects of the tissues and organs are studied. The developmental anatomy of the organ systems will also be presented. 3R, 3L, 16W (Split classes for laboratory).

    ORB 115. General Gross Anatomy Lecture. 10 credits. FA

    Basic instruction in the gross anatomy of the upper extremity, thorax, and abdomen. This course is taught by lecture, laboratory dissection, models, radiographic images, and various multimedia resources. 2R, 6L, 16W (Split classes for laboratory).

    ORB 117. Introduction to Conduct of Research Lecture. 1 credit. FA

    This course will involve the completion of CITI web-based modules, identification of research project mentor, identification of research project topic and completion of all project research plan and IRB submission documents in draft form. S.

    ORB 131. Head and Neck Anatomy. 9 credits. SP

    Basic instruction in the gross anatomy of the head and neck. Special emphasis is placed on the clinical application of anatomy to the various dental disciplines. Such topics include the anatomy and pathology of the TMJ and distribution of the trigeminal and facial nerves with associated applied anatomy. This course is taught by lecture, laboratory dissection, models, radiographic images (x-rays, MRIs, and CTs), and various multimedia resources. 2R, 6L, 8W; 2R, 3L, 4W (Split classes for laboratory).

    ORB 133. Oral Histology and Embryology. 8 credits. SP

    Microscopic and developmental anatomy of the normal cells, tissues and organs of the oral cavity with emphasis on teeth and related tissues. Emphasis will be given to the growth and development of the head and neck. Genetic effects will be presented. 2R, 3L, 8W; 3R, 3L, 8W (Split classes for laboratory).

    ORB 137. Nutrition. 2 credits. SP

    Basic instruction in nutrition, including nutrients for growth and development of oral tissues. Provides knowledge of balanced nutrition and measurement of dietary factors as related to clinical prevention and health care. Focuses on specific nutrition issues of dental patients and oral conditions with applications to clinical dental practice. 1R, 16W.

    ORB 139. General Neuroscience. 4 credits. SP

    Basic instruction in neuroscience. Major topics include the neuroanatomy of the central and peripheral nervous systems introduced in ORB 115. Special emphasis is given to the cranial nerves, especially the trigeminal and the facial, with appropriate clinical applications to dentistry. Other topics in neurophysiology including membrane potentials, action potentials, and resting potentials are presented. This course is taught by lecture and by various multimedia resources. 2R, 16W.

    ORB 141. Physiology. 8 credits. SP

    Lectures covering human physiology, including membrane phenomena, muscle and nerve reflexes, blood, circulation, respiration, digestion, absorption and secretion, temperature regulation, exercise, humoral nervous correlations, hormonal control of bodily processes, and the special senses, will be presented. 4R, 16W.

    PER 132. Periodontal Instrumentation. 3 credits. SP

    Introduction to basic examination and periodontal armamentarium focusing on operatory set-up, operator and patient positioning, and instrument selection and use. 3R, 3L or C, 16W (Split classes).

    PRS 131. Occlusion Lecture. 2 credits. SP

    Basic principles of maxillo-mandibular relationships, static and functional, as related to the occlusal surfaces of the teeth. 1R, 16W.

    PRS 132. Occlusion Laboratory. 3 credits. SP

    Exercises simulating clinical diagnostic and treatment procedures are employed to exemplify principles of maxillo-mandibular relationships. 3L, 16W.

    Second Year

    DAR 211. Infectious Disease Control in Dentistry. 2 credits. FA

    Provides a basic knowledge of the principles of infection control. Application of the students’ fundamental knowledge of oral pathology, microbiology, public health, and oral diagnosis will be necessary for critical thinking as applied to actual and/or hypothetical clinical situations. 2R, 7W.

    DAR 214. Dental Assisting and Radiology. 3 credits. FA

    Sophomore students in this entry-level, clinically-oriented course will be assisting juniors and seniors with oral diagnosis and prophylaxis procedures. Sophomores will also utilize their digital and conventional radiographic technique skills to obtain the necessary patient images for diagnostic and treatment planning purposes. Juniors and seniors will gain supervisory experience while directing their colleagues in the Radiology Clinic. This course builds on radiographic technique and diagnostic skills learned in DAR 121DAR 131 and DAR 132. 8C, 7W.

    DAR 215. Oral Diagnosis. 3 credits. FA

    Lectures designed to acquaint the preclinical student with the fundamentals of the interview, the principles and procedures of clinical examination, the methods of identifying oral diseases, and the rationale for oral therapy. Following the correlation of facts obtained, the formulation of a diagnosis, prognosis and treatment plan is made. This is accompanied by a clinical introduction of students to the treatment of patients in clinical setting, including the principles of clinical examination, dental hygiene procedures and infection control. 1R, 16W; 4C, 2W (Clinic sessions are split classes).

    DAR 216. axiUm Training Lab. 2 credits.

    This course introduces the student to axiUm, the patient management system used in the Dental School clinic. Primary focus is on utilization of the electronic health record (EHR). The student will learn electronic patient form entry (EPR Form), odontogram charting, periodontal charting, modification of CDT procedure codes, treatment planning and treatment note entry with an emphasis on preparing the student for the summer periodontics courses and fall clinic rotation in oral diagnosis. Clinic.

    DAR 217. Radiology Lecture. 4 credits.

    This course will consist of: Basic principles of radiation physics, biology, protection, geometry, and technique. Radiographic anatomy. Recognition of common pathology including inflammatory disease, caries, and periodontal disease. Also develop an understanding of radiographic prescription following the ADA guidelines. A basic discussion of advanced imaging will also be presented. Principles of radiographic interpretation will be covered and discussed.

    DAR 219. General Pathology. 9 credits. FA

    This course teaches the basic principles of general and systemic pathology, concentrating on the etiology, pathogensis and applications to dentistry. Systemic diseases with oral considerations are stressed and actual clinical case histories are utilized whenever appropriate. 3R, 7W; 3R, 16W.

    DAR 224. Radiology Technique. 1 credit. FA

    Radiographic review exercises will be used to gain additional experience in recognition of common pathology, including caries, periodontal disease, periapical lesions, and dental anomalies. Block assignment will be scheduled in the Main Radiology Clinic to gain experience in intra-oral and extra-oral dental digital radiography. 3C, 2W (Split class).

    DAR 232. Oral Hygiene and Recall Clinic. 1 credit. SP

    An initial introduction of the students to the treatment of patients in a clinical setting. Principles of oral hygiene, infection control, record keeping and extraoral/intraoral examination are applied to patient care. 4C, 2W.

    DAR 234. Radiology Lecture and Technique. 3 credits. SP

    This course will provide hands-on instruction regarding imaging principles and various techniques of conventional and digital intraoral radiography. Instruction will focus on the projection geometry of paralleling and bisecting angle techniques. Students will learn infection control, quality assurance, and recognition and prevention of radiographic pitfalls. 3L, 16W.

    DAR 235. Oral Pathology. 7 credits. SP

    This course is designed to present etiologic, basic histopathologic, and clinical information of diseases that commonly manifest in the oral cavity and the head and neck regions. Prognosis and treatment of these diseases will be stressed. Heavy emphasis will be placed on clinical recognition and differential diagnoses. 4R, 16W.

    END 213. Pulp Biology / Endodontics. 2 credits. FA

    Histology, physiology and functions of the pulp as well as the disease processes that involve the pulp and periradicular tissues. 1R, 16W.

    END 233. Endodontic Techniques. 2 credits. SP

    Basic principles of endodontics including diseases of the pulp and periapical tissues, diagnosis and treatment procedures, prognosis, bleaching, and restoration of endodontically treated teeth. 1R, 16W.

    END 234. Endodontics Laboratory. 3 credits. SP

    Practical application of endodontic treatment procedures and principles performed on plastic and natural teeth mounted in stone to simulate clinical practice. 3L, 16W.

    GDO 213. Operative Dentistry Lecture. 2 credits. FA

    Introduction to diagnosis, prevention and treatment of disease, developmental defects, or traumatic injuries of the hard tissues of individual teeth. Emphasis is placed on mechanical aspects of preparing and restoring individual teeth with specific restorative materials, the physical and biomechanical properties of these materials, and the development of problem solving skills to select appropriate treatments and materials. 1R, 16W.

    GDO 214. Operative Dentistry Laboratory. 7 credits. FA

    Application of surgical principles to the treatment of diseases and defects of the teeth. Preparations and restorations are performed on natural teeth mounted in stone, typodont models, and plaster teeth. Detailed surgical excisions are made in harmony with principles of tooth anatomy, pathology of the lesions, and masticatory function. Manipulative techniques of the materials commonly employed in operative dentistry are emphasized. Specifically, Class I, II and V amalgams as well as Class I, II, IV and V resin composition are covered. 7L, 16W.

    GDO 233. Operative Dentistry Lecture. 2 credits. SP

    Diagnosis, prevention and treatment of disease, developmental defects, or traumatic injuries of the hard tissues of individual teeth. Emphasis is placed on mechanical aspects of preparing and restoring individual teeth with specific restorative materials, the physical and biomechanical properties of these materials, and the development of problem solving skills to select appropriate treatments and materials. 1R, 16W.

    GDO 234. Operative Dentistry Laboratory. 7 credits. SP

    Application of surgical principles to the treatment of diseases and defects of the teeth. Preparations and restorations are performed on natural teeth mounted in stone, typodont models, and plaster teeth. Detailed surgical excisions are made in harmony with principles of tooth anatomy, pathology of the lesions, and masticatory function. Manipulative techniques of the materials commonly employed in operative dentistry are emphasized. Specifically, Class II indirect gold as well as Class II, III, IV and V resin composites are covered. 7L, 8W; 6L, 8W.

    ORB 211. Microbiology. 7 credits. FA

    Basic instruction in bacteriology, immunology, mycology, virology, and parasitology. This course includes a discussion of microbiology as it pertains to the mouth and to the dentition. 4R, 8W; 3R, 8W.

    ORB 213. Biochemistry. 8 credits. FA

    Study of the chemical components of the body with primary emphasis upon the structure, function and synthesis of the macromolecule components of cells and tissues. The roles of proteins, nucleic acids, lipids, and saccharides in metabolic processes and metabolic regulation are examined as are the interrelationships among carbohydrates, lipids, amino acids, purines, and pyrimidines. Replication and expression of genetic information are discussed in the context of growth regulation, hormone action, genetic disorders, and malignant disease. 4R, 16W.

    ORB 231. Pharmacology. 3 credits. SP

    Lectures and discussions on pharmacological principles, including pharmacokinetics, drug metabolism, drug receptors, pharmacodynamics and pharmacotherapeutics. Specific drug classes include antimicrobial drugs (antibiotics and antifungals), endocrine pharmacology, anti-cancer and anti-viral drugs, drug-drug interactions, and drug abuse. Prescription writing is also presented. 2R, 8W; 1R, 8W.

    OMS 233. Pain Control/Anesthesia. 4 credits. SP

    Patient evaluation, indications, contraindications, methods of administration, complications and clinical applications associated with local anesthesia, analgesia, and general anesthesia. Includes integration of basic pharmacology. 3R, 4W and 1R, 3C, 12W (Split classes for clinic).

    PDO 213. Physical Growth and Development. 2 credits. FA

    Growth and development of the craniofacial complex. Developmental anomalies. Postnatal growth with special consideration of development of the primary and permanent dentitions. Etiology of malocclusion. 1R, 16W.

    PDO 234. Pedodontics/Orthodontics Technique. 5 credits. SP

    This course will feature advanced techniques for the manipulation of stainless steel materials and other materials and appliances used in preventive and interceptive orthodontic procedures. Technique application in the reduction and restoration of tooth structure as applied to the primary, mixed, and young permanent dentitions will also be covered. Finally, several mini-clinics will be conducted throughout the semester which will help prepare students for their junior year clinical pediatric dentistry experience. Topics will include behavior management, dental assistant utilization, and local anesthesia. This course will conclude with a pediatric dentistry clinic orientation. 1R, 16W; 3L, 16W.

    PER 212. Clinical Introduction to Scaling and Polishing. 1 credit. FA

    This course will introduce new sophomore students to clinical procedures with emphasis on dental prophylaxis and periodontal instrumentation. 3C, 7W. (Split class).

    PER 213. Periodontology Lecture. 2 credits. FA

    This course presents the ultra structural features of the healthy periodontium and contrasts those with that found in periodontal diseases. The student is introduced to the diagnosis of periodontal diseases as well as the relevant etiology and contributory factors. 1R, 16W.

    PER 233. Periodontology Lecture. 2 credits. SP

    This course presents the integration of treatments of periodontal diseases in the framework of treatment planning for dental and oral issues in general. The student is introduced to case-based analysis and treatment planning. 1R, 16W.

    PRS 211. Complete Denture Prosthodontics Lecture. 2 credits. FA

    Fundamentals of treating the completely edentulous patient. 1R, 16W.

    PRS 212. Complete Denture Prosthodontics Laboratory. 7 credits. FA

    Laboratory exercises are designed to familiarize the student with the process of complete denture fabrication through simulated exposure to the basic clinical steps of treating the edentulous patient and the laboratory procedures required to construct the prosthesis. 7L, 16W.

    PRS 213. Fixed Prosthodontics Lecture. 2 credits. FA

    Study of the basic restorations involved in restoring oral function by use of fixed prostheses. 1R, 16W.

    PRS 214. Fixed Prosthodontics Laboratory. 5 credits. FA

    Participation in technical exercises designed to provide experience in the construction of basic fixed prosthodontic restorations. 6L, 8W; 3L, 8W.

    PRS 231. Removable Partial Denture Lecture. 2 credits. SP

    Basic principles of removable partial denture design. Component parts, abutment tooth preparation, surveying and designing are the primary objectives to be mastered. 1R, 16W.

    PRS 232. Removable Partial Denture Laboratory. 3 credits. SP

    Laboratory exercises utilize partially edentulous casts and surveyors to survey and design each of the four major classes of removable partial dentures. 3L, 16W.

    PRS 233. Fixed Prosthodontics Lecture. 2 credits. SP

    Study of the basic restorations involved in restoring oral function by use of fixed prostheses. 1R, 16W.

    PRS 234. Fixed Prosthodontics Laboratory. 6 credits. SP

    Participation in technical exercises designed to provide experience in the construction of basic fixed prosthodontic restorations. 6L, 16W.

    Third Year

    CPD 312. Community Dentistry Field Experience. 1 credit. FA, SP

    Provides the dental student with an opportunity to apply motivational and instructional techniques regarding patient dental education through community field experiences. F.

    CPD 313. Behavioral Science Aspects of Patient Care. 2 credits. FA

    The goal of this course is to enhance the students’ ability to care for the patient by increasing the knowledge relevant to behavioral science topics. These include, but are not limited to topics such as empathy, rapport, communication, fear and anxiety, smoking cessation, domestic violence, and patients with disabilities, both physical and mental. Working with patients of different cultures will also be addressed. The student will work in managing various challenging situations through application of learned skills. 1R, 3W; 2R, 3W; 8R, 1W.

    CPD 314. Cardio-Pulmonary Resuscitation. 1 credit. FA

    A formalized course in Cardio-Pulmonary Resuscitation leading to CPR re-certification in Basic Life Support for Health Care Providers. 1R, 3L, 1W (Split classes).

    CPD 331. Practice Planning. 2 credits. SP

    Designed to introduce the student to practice management principles. Covers the process of staffing and running an office. Employment law as well as communication with staff is emphasized. Equipment needs for a dental office are explored as well as the design and function of a dental office. Also included in the course are the principles of filing an insurance claim, the terminology that accompanies patient billing practice and the different types of insurance networks and plans. Payroll management and tax regulations are introduced. 1R, 16W.

    CPD 333. Public Health Dentistry. 2 credits. SP

    Introduction of Dental Public Health, noting the dentist has a “primary duty of service to the public.” Emphasis is placed on health promotion and education, epidemiology of oral diseases, sociology and cultural differences of the dental practice, dental public health research and prevention, clinician’s responsibility to access and justice, delivery systems, and financing dental care. 1R, 16W.

    CPD 335. Evidence-Based Dental Care: Understanding and Evaluating Dental Research. 2 credits. SP

    This course is designed to provide the student with the foundational information necessary to understand the principles of evidence-based dental practice, to critically evaluate health sciences research literature, and to apply the findings of scientific inquiry to clinical practice. Key learning milestones include the understanding of scientific information sources, research study designs, hierarchies of evidence, basic statistics, and epidemiology. The ultimate purpose of the course is to reinforce the importance of life-long learning and critical thinking in the application of scientific discovery to patient care. 1R, 12W; 1F, 4W.

    DAR 313. Radiographic Interpretation. 3 credits. FA

    Radiographic features pertaining to craniofacial structures as well as to developmental, neoplastic and systemic diseases will be discussed. 4R, 4W; 2R, 3W.

    DAR 314. Oral Diagnosis and Treatment Planning Clinic. 3 credits. FA, SP

    This course is designed to provide clinical experience in oral diagnosis, radiology, treatment planning, oral hygiene and assessment of treatment outcomes. An integral aspect of this course is the opportunity to apply and integrate the knowledge and principles learned in the classroom courses in oral diagnosis, oral medicine, oral pathology, and oral radiology to individual patients in clinical situations. The students is guided in the collection and analysis of acceptable treatment options for each patient. C.

    DAR 315. Dental Management of Medically Complex Patients. 2 credits. FA

    This course is designed to enhance the students’ understanding of medical conditions, the recognition of compromised states, and the subsequent modifications to dental care to prevent adverse side effects from procedures and drugs used in dentistry. Emphasis is placed on analyzing findings from patient histories, signs and symptoms, writing appropriate medical consultations and formulating treatment plans that are compatible with a patient’s medical status. 1R, 16W.

    DAR 316. Patient Assessment Clinic. 2 credits. FA, SP

    Junior dental students will participate in the Patient Assessment Clinic to assist senior dental students in the evaluation of patients applying as candidates for treatment at the dental school. This involves management of dental unit infection control, entry of electronic health record documentation, review of patients medical history, exposing and processing radiographs requested by the senior dental student, and escorting patients to financial and appointment services. C.

    DAR 318. Radiographic Interpretation Clinic. 1 credit. FA, SP

    This course will be composed of small group teaching of 4 students for 2 hours during which time the interpretation of intraoral and panoramic radiographs will occur. Each student will present one case. Students will learn to recognize radiographic anatomical structures, especially soft tissues of the palate, tongue, and pharynx. Common artifacts such as ghosts and air spaces will also be demonstrated. In addition, caries, periodontal, apical and bone pathology including TMJs, will be assessed. Students will provide structured written radiographic reports to include labeling of anatomy, image quality, irradiation geometry, and disease changes between seral radiographs. C.

    DAR 331. Temporomandibular Disorders/Orofacial Pain. 2 credits. SP

    A lecture course focused upon the classification, examination, diagnosis, and management of temporomandibular disorders and orofacial pain. Special attention will be given to the neurophysiology of the masticatory system and how it relates to acute and chronic pain conditions. Emphasis will be placed upon the use of standardized classification and diagnostic criteria for formulating and implementing conservative treatment/management plans. 1R, 16W.

    END 313. Endodontic Problem Solving. 2 credits. FA

    Problem solving techniques and procedures including the management of endodontic emergencies, endodontic-periodontic problems, vital pulp therapy, traumatic injuries, and other endodontic problems. 1R, 16W.

    END 314. Endodontic Clinic. 4 credits. FA, SP

    Clinical practice of non-surgical endodontics involving the adult dentition. A wide variety of experiences using current clinical methods, technology and materials. C.

    GDD 316. Acute Care Clinic. 3 credits. FA, SP

    Students will treat patients who present with some form of dental emergency during scheduled block rotations. The opportunity to apply the knowledge and principles learned in classroom courses in oral diagnosis, oral medicine, oral pathology, general dentistry, fixed and removable prosthodontics, endodontics, periodontics, and oral radiology to clinical situations is an integral aspect of this course. The student is guided in the collection and analysis of data on patients and, subsequent to this, receives guidance in the formation of an acceptable plan and the application of the corresponding emergent treatment for each patient. C.

    GDO 313. Operative Dentistry Lecture. 2 credits. FA

    General review to reinforce the principles of operative dentistry procedures with consideration for the transition to clinical application. Special emphasis is placed on recognition and treatment of pathology pertinent to the teeth and the evaluation of acceptable dental materials and techniques. 1R, 16W.

    GDO 314. Operative Dentistry Clinic. 12 credits. FA, SP

    The student provides basic restorative services in a clinical practice setting. Emphasis is placed on correct preparation of teeth with placement of currently acceptable materials, prevention of disease and maintenance of oral health. C.

    GDO 333. Operative Dentistry Lecture. 2 credits. SP

    This course is an introduction to contemporary operative dental procedures, including the evaluation and review of newly developed restorative materials. Special emphasis is placed on non-carious conditions such as cracked tooth syndrome and elective esthetic dentistry. 1R, 16W.

    GDP 312. Relative Value Units. 8 credits. FA

    Designed to encourage comprehensive patient care. Grade is earned by combining treatment efforts across disciplines and departmental lines. C.

    GDP 332. Relative Value Units. 8 credits. SP

    Designed to encourage comprehensive patient care. Grade is earned by combining treatment efforts across disciplines and departmental lines. C.

    ORB 311. Dental Pharmacology. 4 credits. FA

    Lectures and discussions on pharmacological principles and specific drug classes. Specific drug classes include anesthetics, analgesics, sedative hypnotics, autonomic drugs, cardiovascular drugs, and central nervous system pharmacology. 2R, 16W.

    OMS 314. Oral Surgery Clinic. 4 credits. FA, SP

    Summer and fall semesters are dedicated primarily to assistance and observation of senior students in the performance of oral surgical procedures. During the spring semester, oral surgery cases are treated as required by each student. Students diagnose and treat patients presenting surgical conditions and are taught to refer care beyond their training. Demonstration surgery of complicated surgical procedures is performed by faculty for small-group instruction. C.

    OMS 315. Oral Surgery Lecture. 2 credits. FA

    This course is designed to prepare each dental student with the ability to evaluate, diagnose, treatment plan and effectively deliver the surgical treatment that is expected of a dental professional. Basic concepts that are covered include: principles of surgical infection control, surgical armamenturium, uncomplicated and complicated dentoalveolar surgery, post-surgical complication recognition and management, and wound healing. Additional topics include: an introduction to orofacial infections and management; pre-prosthetic surgery; biopsy principles and techniques; surgical indications and risks associated with oral surgery; and the development of criteria for seeking consultation either before or after surgery. 1R; 16W.

    OMS 331. Physical Diagnosis/Medical Emergencies. 2 credits. SP

    This course is designed to develop an understanding of pre-surgical and pre-anesthesia patient assessment. The major components of a medical history are reviewed, including interview principles, elicitation of symptoms, observation of signs and documentation of information. The students are introduced to pre-surgical and pre-anesthesia patient evaluation and risk assessment as it pertains to the major systems-cardiovascular, pulmonary, endocrine, renal and liver, hematopoietic and the cancer patient. Medical emergencies and their management are integrated into the discussion of the major systems-syncope, airway obstruction, laryngospasm, bronchospasm, angina, MI, allergic response, hyperventilation and seizures. 1R, 16W.

    PDO 313. Principles of Orthodontics and Dento-Facial Growth and Development. 2 credits. FA

    This course will feature advanced techniques for the manipulation of stainless steel materials and other materials and appliances used in preventive and interceptive orthodontic procedures. Technique application in the reduction and restoration of tooth structure as applied to the primary, mixed, and young permanent dentitions will also be covered. Finally, several mini-clinics will be conducted throughout the semester which will help prepare students for their junior year clinical pediatric dentistry experience. Topics will include behavior management, dental assistant utilization, and local anesthesia. This course will conclude with a pediatric dentistry clinic orientation. 1R, 16W; 3L, 16W.

    PDO 314. Orthodontic Diagnosis and Treatment Planning Clinic. 3 credits. FA, SP

    Clinical course in which each junior student evaluates a fellow student from an orthodontic perspective and obtains orthodontic models. A more complete set of orthodontic records is analyzed to establish a thorough orthodontic diagnosis. Each student will be responsible for the diagnosis of at least one case. C.

    PDO 315. Pediatric Dentistry. 4 credits. FA

    This course is designed to provide fundamental principles and basic knowledge in pediatric dentistry. Topics include etiology of caries and caries control methods, behavior management, principles of pulpal therapy and restorative dentistry as applied to the child patient, space maintenance, oral surgery for the pediatric patient, adolescent dentistry, child abuse recognition, emergency procedures for trauma and infection, oral lesions and periodontal conditions in children, hospital dentistry, and dentistry for patients with special needs. Particular emphasis will be placed on basic and essential knowledge in providing pediatric dental care by general practitioners. 2R, 16W.

    PDO 316. Pediatric Dentistry Clinic. 5 credits. FA, SP

    Students are assigned to the pediatric dental clinic on a rotating basis. Students participate in seminars and case presentations. Students diagnose pediatric patients, develop treatment plans, and present findings/preventative strategies to patients/parents within the framework of anticipatory guidance. Students demonstrate proficiency in pediatric dentistry by performing comprehensive dental care for patients ranging in age from infancy to middle adolescence as well as special needs patients. Students also receive instruction in dental auxiliary utilization and four handed dentistry. C.

    PDO 331. Orthodontics. 2 credits. SP

    This course presents an introductory foundation for clinical orthodontics. The physiology and mechanics of tooth movement are discussed. Methodologies for predicting and modifying growth relative to growing patients with skeletal problems are presented. The classifications of malocclusions are reviewed along with treatment modalities specific to each category. Philosophies for conventional removable and fixed orthodontic appliances are discussed along with specific mechanical principles of each appliance system. Rationale for possible extraction of teeth to facilitate orthodontic treatment along with the relationship of orthodontic tooth movement to the temporomandibular joint are presented. Following course completion students should understand which patients may be amenable to treatment by a general practitioner and which require specialized care. 1R, 16W.

    PER 313. Periodontology Lecture. 2 credits. FA

    This course reviews National Board Part 2 issues, including the etiology, contributory factors, and diagnosis of bacterial plaque induced periodontics. This course also introduces the student to the various applications of periodontal surgeries. 1R, 16W.

    PER 314. Periodontology Clinic. 5 credits. FA, SP

    Clinical practice of periodontal therapeutic procedures. C.

    PER 333. Periodontology Lecture. 2 credits. SP

    This course introduces the student to implantology, crown lengthening surgery and interrelationships between periodontics and other specialties. The student also participates in case-based treatment planning exercises in preparation for the National Board Part 2 examination. 1R, 16W.

    PRS 311. Removable Partial Denture Lecture. 2 credits. FA

    Advanced course in removable partial dentures. Emphasis is given to clinical procedures such as diagnosis, treatment planning, mouth preparations, impressions, jaw relation records, framework adaptation, and occlusion. Infection control and relining of partial dentures are also discussed. 1R, 16W.

    PRS 312. Removable Prosthodontics Clinic. 5 credits. FA, SP

    Treating completely edentulous patients, partially edentulous patients, and the restoration of implants. C.

    PRS 313. Fixed Prosthodontics Lecture. 2 credits. FA

    Planning and design of various fixed restorations pertinent to complete oral health, stressing masticatory function. Discussion of clinical application of basic techniques and introduction of more advanced and complex techniques employed in the construction of fixed bridges and ceramic restorations. 1R, 16W.

    PRS 314. Fixed Prosthodontics Clinic. 5 credits. FA, SP

    Clinical practice in the construction of the simpler types of crowns and bridges and in the restoration of implants, as appropriate C.

    PRS 315. Implant Fundamentals. 1 credit. FA

    Didactic and clinical implantology to include physiologic basis, patient evaluation, and basic clinical principles. 2R, 4 Sessions.

    PRS 331. Complete Denture Prosthodontics. 2 credits. SP

    Advanced course in complete denture procedures with emphasis on the clinical procedures necessary to satisfy the functional esthetic needs of the edentulous patient. Immediate, interim and treatment dentures as well as relines, rebases and repair procedures are discussed. An overview of overdentures and implant prosthesis provided. 1R, 16W.

    PRS 333. Fixed Prosthodontics Lecture. 2 credits. SP

    Planning and design of various fixed restorations pertinent to complete oral health, stressing masticatory function. Discussion of clinical application of basic techniques and introduction of more advanced and complex techniques employed in the construction of fixed bridges and ceramic restorations. 1R, 16W.

    Fourth Year

    CPD 411. Business of Practice. 3 credits. FA

    Designed to provide background information to assist in making informed decisions when agreeing to work as a dental associate. Employment contract language is discussed at length. The principles of purchasing a practice are explored including methods used in valuing a practice and financing the purchase of a practice. Principles are discussed for disability insurance, dental malpractice insurance and general office insurance. 1R, 8W; 2R, 8W.

    CPD 412. Community Dentistry Field Experience Clinic. 5 credits. FA, SP

    Provides the dental student with an opportunity to apply motivational and instructional techniques regarding patient dental education through community field experience. F.

    CPD 413. Ethics in the Practice of Dentistry I. 3 credits. FA

    Provides an understanding of classical health care ethical principles which have direct relevance to students’ training and future dental practice experience. Focuses on common ethical dilemmas found in the relationships between student and dental school, between dentist and patient, between dentists themselves, and between dentist and the community. 2R, 8W; 1S, 6W.

    CPD 431. Ethics in the Practice of Dentistry II. 1 credit. SP

    Students will discuss dental practice laws and licensing; impaired colleagues, peer review and whistle blowing; dental malpractice; prescription fraud and drug diversion; legal and social implications for treating mentally and physically challenged individual; and quality assurance in dentistry. 1S, 8W.

    CPD 433. Financial Planning and Jurisprudence. 2 credits. SP

    Emphasis on personal financial planning, OSHA and HIPAA regulations as affecting the dental practice and office computer management. Building upon principles of office management in preparation for entering the practice of dentistry. 2R, 8W.

    DAR 413. Oral Pathology. 2 credits. FA

    This course is designed to review and refine critical thinking skills that are necessary in diagnosing common diseases that involve the oral cavity and the head and neck regions. Clinical recognition of orofacial lesions and the continued development of reasonable and sound differential diagnoses will be the central theme. 1R, 16W.

    DAR 414. Oral Diagnosis and Treatment Planning Clinic. 2 credits. FA, SP

    The student applies accepted concepts and procedures of examination, problem identification, outcomes assessment, diagnosis and treatment planning, stating concisely the therapeutic measures that will constitute satisfactory therapy. The student provides patient education and home care instructions and performs coronal and subgingival scaling, prophylaxis and fluoride treatment. C.

    DAR 416. Patient Assessment Clinic. 2 credits. FA, SP

    Senior dental students will participate under supervision of department faculty to evaluate patients applying as candidates for treatment at the dental school. This will require evaluation of the patient health history, chief complaint, and a screening of their oral health status to include requesting of appropriate minimal radiographs to identify and categorize dental treatment indications. The goal of this clinical block assignment is to train the dental student in making rapid accurate assessments of patient treatment needs and medical risk assessment classifications that are appropriate for the dental school’s scope of care and the student’s level of skills. C.

    END 413. Advanced Endodontics, Surgery And Review. 2 credits. FA

    General review of endodontics emphasizing advanced clinical techniques, pain management, surgical endodontics and new trends in the field of endodontic therapy. 2R, 8W.

    END 414. Endodontic Clinic. 4 credits. FA, SP

    Clinical practice of endodontics. Senior students, working with an increased degree of independence, are expected to complete a variety of cases. C.

    GDD 416. Acute Care Clinic. 3 credits. FA, SP

    Students will treat patients who present with some form of dental emergency during scheduled block rotations. The opportunity to apply the knowledge and principles learned in classroom courses in oral diagnosis, oral medicine, oral pathology, general dentistry, fixed and removable prosthodontics, endodontics, periodontics, and oral radiology to clinical situations is an integral aspect of this course. The student is guided in the collection and analysis of data on patients and, subsequent to this, receives guidance in the formation of an acceptable plan and the application of the corresponding emergent treatment for each patient. C.

    GDO 414. Operative Dentistry Clinic. 12 credits. FA, SP

    The student participates in clinical procedures of single tooth restorations. These include a number of diversified operations, both intra – coronal and extra – coronal using current restorative materials and techniques. C.

    GDP 412. Relative Value Units. 8 credits. FA

    Designed to encourage comprehensive patient care. Grade is earned by combining treatment efforts across disciplines and departmental lines. C.

    GDP 432. Relative Value Units. 8 credits. SP

    Designed to encourage comprehensive patient care. Grade is earned by combining treatment efforts across disciplines and departmental lines. C.

    ORB 411. Dental Pharmacology Update. 1 credit. FA

    Concise reviews and case presentations on major drug classes. Emphasis is placed on integration of knowledge and problem solving. 1R, 8W.

    OMS 413. Oral Surgery Lecture. 2 credits. FA

    A more extensive coverage of the diagnosis and treatment of orofacial infections, including a discussion of fascial spaces; diagnosis and treatment of orofacial trauma; diagnosis and treatment of skeletal deformities with orthognathic surgery; cleft lip and palate considerations; and surgery of the temporomandibular joint. 1R, 16W.

    OMS 414. Oral Surgery Clinic. 4 credits. FA, SP

    Oral surgery cases are treated as required by each student. Students diagnose and treat patients presenting surgical conditions and are taught to refer care beyond their training. Demonstration surgery of complicated surgical procedures is performed by faculty for small-group instruction. C.

    PDO 413. Principles of Orthodontics and Dento-Facial Growth and Development. 2 credits. FA

    Emphasis is placed on evidence-based orthodontics along with new technologies while revisiting basic background information pertinent to every dentist regarding orthodontics. Growth and development of the craniofacial complex will be iterated as it relates to the diagnosis and treatment of patients with congenital abnormalities. Particular consideration is given to recognition of orthodontic situations that will be encountered in the general dental practice. Early treatment and adult treatment are discussed regarding timing and types of treatment for these diverse age groups. Retention, absolute anchorage and surgical-orthodontic modalities are presented. After completing this course, students should realize a general dentist may not wish to render orthodontic treatment to most patients but is responsible for recognition of problems and referral to an orthodontic specialist in a proper and timely fashion. 1R, 16W.

    PDO 414. Orthodontic Diagnosis and Treatment Planning Clinic. 3 credits. FA, SP

    Clinical course in which each senior student participates in the orthodontic clinic observing all phases of orthodontic treatment. Students will be expected to provide a comprehensive evaluation of a patient’s orthodontic condition, obtain quality orthodontic records for proper diagnosis and treatment planning, present a treatment plan to the patient, and observe active treatment of patients. Students may elect to directly provide active orthodontic treatment to assigned patients for extra credit. C.

    PDO 418. Pediatric Dentistry Clinic. 5 credits. FA, SP

    This course is an extension of the junior clinical pediatric dentistry experience. Students are assigned to the pediatric dental clinic on a rotating basis. Senior students participate in seminars and present pediatric dental cases. A continuum of proficiency and independence is expected in providing comprehensive dental care for the pediatric population and special needs patients. Dental auxiliary utilization and four handed dentistry are emphasized. C.

    PER 413. Periodontology Lecture. 2 credits. FA

    This course is a general review of periodontics, including a more extensive coverage of periodontal anatomy, relevant immunology, pathology, diagnosis, treatment planning and management or periodontal diseases. 1R, 16W.

    PER 414. Periodontology Clinic. 5 credits. FA, SP

    Clinical practice of periodontal therapeutic procedures. C.

    PRS 412. Removable Prosthodontics Clinic. 5 credits. FA, SP

    Applying the principles and procedures involved in removable complete and partial denture prosthodontics; demonstrating competence in diagnosis, treatment planning, surveying, designing and constructing removable prostheses to restore complete and partial edentulism; and the restoration of implants. C.

    PRS 414. Fixed Prosthodontics Clinic. 5 credits. FA, SP

    Applying basic and advanced principles of fixed prosthodontics to restore the dentition to form and function using cast metals, porcelain restorations, porcelain-fused-to-metal restorations, and composite restorative materials as well as the restoration of implants. C.

    PRS 415. Advanced Implantology. 2 credits.

    Follow-on course to PRS 315. This course presents continuing education level lectures covering implant topics of great interest to practicing dentists. 1R, 16W.

    PRS 417. Advanced Clinical Dentistry Lecture. 2 credits. FA

    This course emphasizes comprehensive dental care delivered by both specialists and generalists by addressing the multi-disciplinary needs of the patient. Information may be new, advanced, controversial, or unique. This diverse staging examines and addresses complex issues in a somewhat different environment and assists in the preparation for Part II of the National Board. 1R, 16W.

    Interviewing

    Applicants to Creighton University will take part in a small group interview and a group problem solving session. Afterward, students will be interviewed individually by alumni, staff, and students.

    Mission

    The purpose of the School of Dentistry is to educate students who can demonstrate the attainment of competence and the progression toward proficiency in providing for the oral health needs of society.  This education will be conducted in a culture and learning environment that reflects Ignatian humanism and a Catholic, Jesuit heritage.

    References